Grading Kona Beans – What do the bean sizes mean

Artisan Roasted Coffee

Grading by bean size and amount of defects.

The dry mill grades the green coffee beans according to size and number of defects in a given batch.

Grading the Beans – Size differences

Fancy or Kona #1 beans make up about 75 percent of the harvest. These are the beans most coffee drinkers are grinding when they’re making their cup.

Extra Fancy beans  make up about 20 percent of a farm’s crop. They are heavier and larger. They are the biggest in size and will have the least amount of defects.

Peaberry  is the rarest of the beans, typically accounting for 3-5% of the total crop. They are genetic anomalies. Normally, two coffee beans are in a berry. However, in the case of peaberry, there’s just one bean. Regular coffee beans are also flat on one side and round on the other, but peaberries look like almost like little footballs. They have a lower acidity and because of their shape, they roast differently and have a slightly different taste. Connoisseurs say they are the smoothest of all and have more of a chocolaty flavor than the other Kona beans .

Estate:

Also, you might hear the term Estate Grown. Estate means all the beans are all from the same farm. Estate is usually not graded so it may contain a mix of all grades of Kona.

No matter what kind of bean you choose to drink, make it 100 Percent Pure Kona Coffee. Its balanced flavor, low acidity and world renowned quality is unparalleled.

Java Lovers, Beware of the Coffee Borer Beetle!

Bearer Borer Beetle

Kona Coffee is at risk as the coffee borer beetle destroys coffee crops!

Coffee Borer Beetle
Coffee Bearer Borer Beetle

Some know it as the berry borer beetle or the coffee borer beetle. However, this African pest is now invading Kona and is a real threat to its coffee. This pest is about 1.5 mm long. Females can fly short distances but the males do not have wings. The beetle costs the coffee industry over $500 million each year. Due to Kona’s small harvest, a coffee borer beetle infestation would be devastating.
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Processing Kona Coffee Beans

Drying coffee on a hoshidana

Processing

Processing Kona coffee beans, from harvesting the cherries on the trees to roasting the beans, is an extremely labor-intensive process. Coffee cherries, red when they’re at the peak of their maturity, are picked by hand from the months of late August to January. The cherries are fermented and washed in clean, fresh water. Then wet milling separates the beans from the outer skin. The beans are then dried. Next they are dry milled to separate the parchment skin from the green beans. And finally the green beans are roasted and bagged.
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Kona Coffee Blends — Know What You’re Drinking

Fresh brewed Kona Coffee in the cup with fresh roasted beans

Pure Kona Coffee beats a Kona blend every time!

For the best coffee drinking experience, drink 100% Pure Kona Coffee – not a blend of Kona beans and beans from other origins. There’s no mistaking pure Kona coffee. For coffee drinkers, there is nothing like pure Kona coffee, but consumers should know about the different Kona coffee blends.

The difference is in the taste – buyer beware of Kona Coffee blends!

100% Pure Kona Coffee label
Be Sure it is 100% Kona.

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How to store Kona Beans – extend the shelf life

Roasted Coffee Beans

Store your fresh roasted Kona Coffee properly to maximize flavor and freshness.

Store your coffee in the specially designed resealable, one-way valved bags to extend the shelf life of your Kona coffee
Your coffee arrives in a specially designed bag.

Store your coffee in the bag it arrives in. Your Kona Coffee arrives packed in a one-way valved bag. This valve is specially designed to let the natural gasses of your fresh roasted coffee escape, while not letting oxygen in.
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Kona Coffee Farms in the State of Hawaii

Kona Coffee Plantation

A Complete List of Kona Coffee Farms

There’s nothing like visiting Kona coffee farms if you’re looking for a complete coffee experience when you visit Hawaii.  Unless you’ve flown direct to Kona, you’ll probably have to take an interisland flight to the Big Island of Hawaii. The Kona International Airport is located outside the town at Keahole Point. If you’re in Hilo, you can drive to Kona, but it takes about two and half hours (one way) to get there on the old scenic roads.
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What Makes Kona Coffee Special?

What Makes Kona Coffee Special

What Makes Kona Coffee Special?

“Kona Coffee has a richer flavor than any other, be it grown where it may and call it by what name you please,” said Mark Twain in 1866. Indeed, people recognize and value Kona Coffee around the world for its special aroma and unique flavor. Rare and unique, Kona coffee is precious to the people of Hawaii and to the people who have tasted it at least once. But what makes Kona coffee special?

Why Does Kona Coffee Taste so Good?

Kona Coffee Plantation
Coffee farm in Kona, Hawaii

What gives Kona Coffee its unique taste prized all over the world? The rich volcanic soil, high elevation, ideal temperatures, and cloud coverage from Hualalai and Mauna Loa Mountains make Kona region the best place to grow coffee beans. The Kona Mountains protect the land from harsh weather. Moreover, sunny mornings and light rains in the afternoon provide the perfect climate for growing coffee. Consequently, this unique environment gives Kona Coffee an advantage over other types of coffee grown in different parts of the world.

People of Hawaii Take Great Care of Kona Coffee

Kona Coffee trees usually bloom after the winter and are ready for harvesting by the end of the summer. Before the harvest begins, you can see the change in the coffee trees. Instead of the beautiful white flowers, “Kona Snow”, the trees have red beans resembling cherries. It is not cheap to grow coffee free of infestation. Ordinarily, this is what makes Kona coffee special and more expensive than many other types of coffee.

What Makes Kona Coffee Special
Ripe Kona Coffee “Cherries”

After the coffee is hand-picked, it might take two weeks for it to be ready for sale after pulping, drying, and hulling before grading. Only the best coffee beans make it into the final product. The 100% Kona coffee directly from the Kona region of the Big Island of Hawaii meets very high standards. People working on the coffee fields and farms, at the mills, and over the roasters take great care to make sure customers drink the best coffee. Furthermore, there are strict rules for labeling coffee in Hawaii, and only true Kona coffee can receive a label 100% Kona coffee. The Kona Coffee Council was formed to protect Kona coffee.

Kona Coffee Is a Rare Find

Real Kona coffee is very rare. Only coffee from the South and North districts of Kona region of the Big Island of Hawaii is truly Kona Coffee. If you purchase a Kona blend in a store, it might have as little as 10% of Kona coffee beans. Meanwhile, the other 90% is made up of less expensive types of coffee beans.

Drinking real Kona Coffee is a wonderful experience. The best way to find a truthful product is to order it directly from a locally owned and operated source. This is why we offer 100% Pure Kona Coffee directly from Kona, Hawaii with FREE shipping options on select products. It is no wonder people from all over the world love Kona coffee. Its unique blend of aromatic flavors and rich taste make it the best coffee around! Some say its the best in the world. Give it a try, and you may never want to drink any other coffee again.