Brewing Coffee Guide – how to get the most flavor!

Brewing Coffee in a French Press

Step by step instructions on grinding, brewing and making the perfect cup of Kona Coffee, every time!

Kona coffee is a rare, expensive treat that stimulates all the senses. So why do anything less than put some effort into brewing? As you’ll see, it doesn’t take that much more time.

Choose your favorite Kona bean

We stock all bean varieties, to fulfill your need for quality coffee. Choose from:

 

The Grind

Grinding beans is a treat all its own, with its rich, spicy aroma. Also a secret to good coffee often starts with its grind. It’s important to know what of grind works best for the flavor you’re chasing — whether its coarse, medium or fine.

Coarse Grind French Press, Toddy Makers (cold brew method), Vacuum Coffee Maker, and Percolaters
Medium/Fine Grind Auto Drip Makers (with flat bottom filters). Drip Makers (with cone-shaped filters)
Fine Grind Stove Top Espresso Pots
Super Fine Grind Espresso Machines

 

Amount of coffee:

Generally, a good rule to follow is to use 2 tablespoons of coffee beans for every 6 to 8 ounces of water.  Adjust for taste.

Using a blade grinder:

Load your fresh beans in the top of the grinder. Once the grinder is loaded, use the grinder in short bursts  a few seconds each so the coffee doesn’t overheat. Also shake the grinder as it’s grinding to get an even grind size.

Using a Burr Grinder:

Burr grinders offer coffee drinkers greater precision and consistent grind size. It’s a more expensive alternative to other grinding methods, so some time needs to spent figuring out what burr grind works best for you.

The water: 

We recommend using filtered water for brewing. The better the water, the better the end result. Public water systems tend to add undesirable flavors.

Brew your Kona coffee

It’s not enough to bring your water to a boil. You want that water the right temperature  — between 195 and 205 fahrenheit. Just below boiling. Any hotter, and you’ll run the risk of burning the grinds when you add the water.

Kona Coffee in a french press
Kona Coffee steeping in a french press with nice crema.

We recommend using a French press. Add 1 rounded tablespoon of ground coffee for each 4 ounces of water to the French press. Stir the coffee, allowing the  grounds to interact with the hot water.  Wait 3 to 5 minutes for the coffee to steep, then plunge slowly. Complete instructions for getting the most from your French press here.

Drip coffee maker and pour over:

If you’re using a drip coffee maker or using the pour over technique, we recommend using a natural paper filter.  Cloth filters can add undesirable tastes to your cup of Kona. For drip or pour over brewing use the approximately the same amount of coffee described above.

Enjoy!

History of Kona Coffee – Rich as its Taste!

Reverend Samuel Ruggles

 The History of Coffee in Kona

Uchida Coffee Farm at Kona Living History Farm
Uchida Coffee Farm on Kona Living History Farm

History of coffee in Kona is as rich as its taste! With an area of over 4,028 square miles, the island of Hawaii, also known as “The Big Island”, is home to a beautiful region in the west known as the Kona District. The Kona District is home to many different and wonderful attractions, including the Hawaii Ocean Science & Technology Park, the world-famous Ironman World Championship, the rugged “Gold Coast” with some amazing beaches, sea-turtle habitats, and Kona coffee farms.

Reverend Samuel Ruggles
Reverend Samuel Ruggles (wikipedia)

Coffee isn’t native to Hawaii — it was brought to Kona by Samuel Reverend Ruggles in 1828. He brought arabica cuttings from Brazil to see how well it would take to the Big Island’s climate.

As it turned out, Kona’s daily cycle of morning sunshine, afternoon cloud cover and rich volcanic soil was perfect for the coffee plants. Consequently coffee  established itself as a major crop in Hawaii by the end of the 1800s.

A crash in the price of coffee in the late 1890s led to today’s system of independent family farms. The plantations which had been producing most of the coffee beans were forced to sell their land.  As a result the workers bought or leased the land. Generations later, many of these plantation worker descendants are still farming  Kona coffee on the same land.

Harvesting and Processing – little change throughout history.

Harvesting (picking) and then  processing coffee is a tradition in Kona that you’ll see typically from August to January. Farmers and hired pickers collect the red coffee berries.  These berries contain the coffee beans. Then they pulp the fruit. Also known as “wet milling”. Separating the inner bean from the skin or outer layer. The sun, breeze and consistent raking dries the parchment beans. With the exception of some machinery this is the same system used for generations. Then after dry milling the green beans are roasted, bagged and sent around the world. And finally, into your coffee cup.

Order yours here!

How to savor and taste Kona coffee

Cup of Kona Coffee with biscotti

A comprehensive guide on how to properly taste Kona Coffee

Learn to appreciate Kona coffee by learning to properly taste it

Some argue the coffee is a rare treat and its own reward, that doesn’t mean one shouldn’t properly appreciate how to taste Kona coffee.

Sometimes, a few minutes is all someone has to appreciate a cup of coffee. But when you have the time, it’s best to relax and savor the moment.  Maximize enjoyment with your very limited Kona coffee tasting.  The time you take will go a long way toward appreciation and happiness.
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